image


Endangered Species Day
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday May 16 – 18

San Diego Botanic Garden will celebrate Endangered Species Day by providing guests with activities such as: a map guiding visitors to some of our notable endangered species-both native and from other parts of the world, signs with QR Codes at those locations which will direct visitors to additional information and photos. Garden tours will be offered throughout the day. The San Diego Audubon Society will be provide birding tours Friday and Saturday at 8:00 am, and will discuss the importance of habitat preservation for species survival.
In addition to these activities, the Garden will offer free admission to San Diego Audubon Society Members and Living Coast Discovery Center Members Friday, May 16 – Sunday, May 18, and San Diego Botanic Garden members will receive free admission to Living Coast Discovery Center May 16 – 18. Living Coast Discovery Center has various wonderful events throughout the weekend. Visit thelivingcoast.org for their schedule of events.

Cost: Free with admission or membership.


Native Plant Conservation

Preserving existing natural areas at the San Diego Botanic Garden is very important. The Garden is located in Encinitas, California within a mile of the coast. There are approximately eleven acres of natural areas and restored natural areas in the Garden. The local southern maritime chaparral and coastal sage scrub plant communities are some of the nation’s most endangered vegetation types as they are small in size and restricted to coastal areas. Over the past century these Southern California coastal areas have been in high demand for urban development.

Native Plant Conservation

Southern Maritime Chaparral & Coastal Sage Scrub

Coastal Sage Scrub is found from San Francisco south into Baja at low elevations, primarily on mesas within fifteen miles of the coast. Much of the vegetation has semi-deciduous foliage in summer rather than the thick, evergreen foliage of chaparral.

Click image for closeup view For full plant views click on each image below.

Image
Botanical Name
Common Name

Where in the Garden

       
Endangered



Artemisia californica



 
Coastal Sagebrush


Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Endangered



Salvia mellifera




Black Sage


Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden


Endangered



Eriogonum fasciculatum


 
California
Buckwheat


Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden


Endangered



Rhus integrifolia


 
Lemonade-berry

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Endangered



Encelia californica


 
Bush Sunflower

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Native Plant Conservation

Southern Maritime Chaparral grows along the coast from southern Orange County to Point Loma. It is associated with coastal fog and eroded sandstone soils. Although primarily a chamise and black sage chaparral, it includes a number of rare, endemic plant species, including several of the following species.

Click image for closeup view For full plant views click on each image below.

Image
Botanical Name
Common Name

Where in the Garden

       
Endangered



Arctostaphylos glandulosa

ssp. crassifolia

Plant of the Month


 
Del Mar Manzanita


Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Endangered



Baccharis vanessae




Encinitas Baccharis


Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden


Endangered



Ceanothus verrucosus



 
Warty-stem Ceanothus

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden


Endangered



Quercus dumosa


 
Coast Scrub Oak

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Endangered



Cneoridium dumosum


 
Bush Rue

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Endangered



Eriodictyon crassifolium
var. crassifolium


 
Thick-leaf Yerba Santa

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden



Endangered



Opuntia littoralis


 
Prickley Pear Cactus

Overlook Natural Area,
Native Plants, Native Peoples,
California Gardenscapes
Herb Garden




Native Plant Conservation

Endangered Species

Del Mar Manzanita (Arctostaphylos glandulosa ssp. crassifolia)

Del Mar Manzanita (Arctostaphylos glandulosa ssp. crassifolia) is a federally endangered subspecies that grows along the coast from Encinitas, California south into Baja California in maritime chaparral. They are found on sandstone terraces within five to ten miles of the coast.
Today they often survive on sandstone topography that is too rugged and steep for easy development. This manzanita is adapted to wildfires, regrowing from large basal burls.

Del Mar Manzanita grows in the natural area to the east of the Overlook boardwalk and along the trail on the east side of Native Plant, Native People.

Endangered
Photos: Sally Sandler

 

Nevin's Barberry or Mahonia Berberis nevinii (syn. Mahonia nevinii)

Nevin's Barberry (Berberis nevinii) is a federally endangered species native to isolated riparian sites in Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernadino Counties with only a couple of reported sites in San Diego County. This large dense evergreen shrub grows up to 10’ high x 10’ wide and is quite attractive with small prickly, grey compound leaves. Small yellow flowers bloom in late winter to early spring and are followed by small clusters of red fruits in summer. Nursery propagated plants are occasionally available, especially from native plant nurseries.

Large specimens of Nevin’s barberry grow in California Gardenscape, Fire Safety Garden and the Herb Garden.

Endangered
Photos: Herb Knufken and Rachel Cobb

 

Orcutt’s Hazardia or Goldenbush (Hazardia orcuttii)

Orcutt’s hazardia or goldenbush (Hazardia orcuttii) is a subshrub in the Asteraceae or daisy family. The only wild population in the U.S.A. grows on a small hilltop only two miles from the Botanic Garden. There are only a few populations in northern Baja California. This is listed as a state of California threatened species.

The plants generally grow up to three feet tall. They have small evergreen leaves. In late summer they produce small yellow blooms. In a reintroduction project by the California Fish and Game Commission several hundred plants were propagated and planted in a reintroduction effort in several local sites.In 1995 thirty plants in five-gallon nursery containers were planted in the Garden in cooperation with the state and the Center for Natural Lands Management. They were planted in a plot of clay loam soil that had originally come from the same area where the naturally occurring population is found. Most of the plants survived and have since produced several seedlings. The area where these plants grow is within one of the Garden’s natural areas. They can be seen along the west side of the Native Peoples, Native Plants trail.

The San Diego Botanic Garden has conservation-related interpretive signs about these species and their plant communities. We provide conservation information about them as well as other non-native species of conservation concern in educational classes, tours, docent programs, and on our website.

Endangered
Photos: Rachel Cobb

 

Otay Mesa Rose (Rosa minutifolia)

This short, thorny rose has attractive, fragrant pink blooms from January to June. It has tiny compound leaves. Only two plants of Otay Mesa rose (Rosa minutifolia) remain in the wild in the U.S.A. where they grow on the U.S.-Mexico border. The species ranges further south into northern Baja California.

At SDBG this can be seen at the Fire Safety Display by the parking lot and on the west side of California Gardenscape.

OtayRose
Photos: Rachel Cobb

 

Shaw's Agave (Agave shawii)

Shaw’s agave is a small to medium-sized agave with attractive green leaves and reddish brown spines. It forms large clumps over time. After a number of years large, spectacular flower spikes bloom, after which the individual plant dies. Shaw’s agave once grew along coastal San Diego, but in the wild only one plant remains along the U.S.-Mexico border. Further south this agave grows along the Pacific coast of northern Baja.

At SDBG Shaw’s agave can be seen in the New World Desert Garden and California Gardenscape.

Shaw
Photos: Rachel Cobb

 

See the Native Plants and Native People Trail Page
SDBG Plant List

Banner Photo:Del Mar Manzanita | Rachel Cobb



image


image
image